We the Teachers

Saturday Webinars: Martin Luther King, jr. vs. Malcolm X

 

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Drs. Chris Burkett, Peter Myers, and Lucas Morel discussed the different views and goals of Martin Luther King, jr. and Malcolm X in our latest Great American Debates series of Saturday Webinars.

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Documents in Detail: Wilson’s Fourteen Points

 

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Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points laid out Wilson’s plan for not only a post-war world, but in many ways a new world order, in response to the destruction of World War 1. TAH scholars discuss the meaning of, context around, and impact of Wilson’s ideas in this one-hour webinar.

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Saturday Webinar: FDR vs. Hoover

 

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TAH’S Saturday Webinar on March 3rd, 2019, focused on the ideological, practical, and political debates between Franklin Roosevelt and Herbert Hoover, primarily during the election campaign of 1932, but reaching deeper into American traditions of limited government and the role of the federal government in the life of the individual.

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Documents in Detail: Roosevelt’s Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine

 

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An essential statement of America’s changing role in the world at the time, both aimed toward the future and rooted in the past, Theodore Roosevelt’s expansion of the Monroe Doctrine helped to define American international status and power.

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Saturday Webinar: Imperialists vs. Non-Interventionists

 

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TAH.org’s Great American Debates Saturday Webinar for 2 February 2019 focused on the heated years of debate during the late 19th and early 20th centuries over America’s role in the world, and whether or not she should seek to create an empire along the lines of what was common for European states at the time.

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Documents in Detail: Lincoln’s Speech on the Repeal of the Missouri Compromise

 

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Abraham Lincoln’s 1865 speech on the repeal of the Missouri Compromise signaled his return to public life and politics, after a few years of private law practice. In the speech he outlined not only his views on Congress’ action, but also the growing sectional divide, slavery, and the future of America.

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Saturday Webinar: Secessionists vs. Unionists

 

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The first Great American Debates webinar of 2019 took place on Saturday, 12 January, with a deep dive into the causes and ideas behind the opposing – and both diverse and complex in and of themselves – sides in the debate over states’ right, supposedly, to secede. Drs. Scott Yenor, Jonathan White, and Chris Burkett discussed the constitutional, legal, and political dimensions of an issue that had roots far earlier than the flare-up in late 1860.

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Documents in Detail: Thomas Jefferson’s Letter to Roger Weightman

 

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Thomas Jefferson wrote this letter only weeks before his death in 1826, and in it seeks to explain, in effect, what he meant by some of the key ideas expressed in the Declaration of Independence. Coupled with his 1825 letter to Henry Lee, this piece provides an interesting perspective on those ideas, from their key author. Jefferson not only reflects on American independence, but looks far into the future, when “all,” he believed, would seek political liberty, perhaps even in the American tradition.

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Great American Debates: Lincoln vs. Douglas

 

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TAH.org’s last Saturday Webinar for 2018 took place on 1 December, and featured another Great American Debate: Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas, in their famous ‘Lincoln-Douglas Debates’ of 1858. Our panel of scholars, with the assistance of great questions submitted by our live audience of teachers addressed the ideas and issues, rhetoric and reasoning, and immediate and long-term impact and meaning of these singular debates in American history.

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Documents in Detail: Bill of Rights

 

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Our Documents in Detail episode for 14 NOV 18 focused on the Bill of Rights: the politics behind its proposal and adoption; interpretations over time; and place in our history, government, and society. Among the many questions asked during the lively 58-minute program included those about James Madison and Alexander Hamilton, and why they initially did not support an enumeration of rights, but in Madison’s case, eventually went on to promote the legislation that led to the Bill of Rights. Also considered was the notion that to understand the Bill of Rights today, one must understand the original arguments¬†against it.

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Saturday Webinar: Frederick Douglass vs. William Lloyd Garrison

 

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TAH.org’s Saturday Webinar for 10 NOV 2018 focused on the debate between Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison, and their divergent views on the Constitution, solutions to slavery, and the future of America as they saw it. Suggested additional readings include:

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Documents in Detail: Brutus I

 

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The 24 OCT 18 episode of Documents in Detail took a look at Brutus I, one of the essential Antifederalist writings, dated 18 OCT 1787. The program opened with a question from the moderator about why it’s worth reading an argument for one of the “losers” of the ratification debate that waged from 1787-88. Most of the program dug into and drew conclusions and observations based on the root of Brutus’ argument, which was about his concerns over consolidation, and the creation of a single, large republic that would eventually trample the rights of individuals and would be distant and separate from the people it existed to represent.

We experienced a software glitch while recording this program, resulting in the last 12 minutes being muted. We are working to recover this block of audio, and will replace the current, incomplete audio file with the full one if we are able to do that.

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Saturday Webinars: Jefferson vs. Hamilton

 

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The Saturday Webinar for October 2018 featured a discussion of the political and personal split between Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson, with a focus on how their differences contributed to the development of the first political parties, and how their ideas informed the first decades of American economic policy.

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Documents in Detail: Madison’s Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787

 

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Today’s episode of Documents in Detail¬†focused on excerpts from James Madison’s Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787 – the Constitutional Convention. James Madison was the only delegate to attend every day of the convention, and to take notes of all the proceedings, to include summaries of speeches and vote tallies throughout the proceedings. The Debates, published after his death, provide scholars, students, and those interested in American constitutional government an insider’s view of the process by which the Constitution was considered, debated, and eventually signed, and then released to the states for ratification.

An authoritative, contemporary edition of the Debates, edited and prefaced by Professor Gordon Lloyd, is available electronically and in print from Amazon.

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50 Documents That Tell America’s Story

Required reading for students, teachers, and citizens.

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