We the Teachers

Program Report: Lincoln Collouquim in Washington D.C.

This past weekend, educators from the western Pennsylvania region attended a weekend colloquium in Washington, D.C. thanks to the generosity of the Allegheny Foundation.

IMG_3504Dr. Lucas Morel of the University of Washington and Lee, chaired the discussion on Abraham Lincoln. Topics and primary documents considered Lincoln’s view on slavery, secession, equality, the  path to emancipation and preservation of the Union. Teachers enjoyed a private tour of Lincoln’s Cottage in D.C. and spent time with the onsite curriculum specialist using many of their online educational resources.

If you are interested in attending one of our programs, please view our calendar to find one near you.

Program Report: LBJ and Vietnam

Seventeen teachers, ranging from California to New York, joined TAH.org andDr. David Krugler of the University of Wisconsin-Platteville in Austin, Texas, for a weekend colloquium about President Lyndon Johnson’s handling of the Vietnam War. The program included a visit to the LBJ Library and Museum, and discussion sessions aimed at gaining a deeper understanding of LBJ’s reasons for war, escalation, strategy for the conflict, and the impact of anti-war protests on him and American policy. In addition to the reading packet, which can be downloaded here, Dr. Krugler recommended both Patriots: The Vietnam War Remembered From All Sides, and for a thoughtful survey of American foreign policy, Promised Land, Crusader State: The American Encounter with the World Since 1776.

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Program Reports: Three East Coast Weekend Colloquia at Historic Sites

Northampton LF 2016.04This past weekend TAH.org conducted three east coast colloquia at historic sites attended by history and government teachers from across the country.

The Liberty Fund co-sponsored program in Northampton, Massachusetts on President Calvin Coolidge was held at the Historic Hotel Northampton Inn. Dr. William Ruger led discussions on Coolidge’s Political Economy, Education, Self-Government and the Constitution. Participants enjoyed a private tour of Calvin Coolidge’s Presidential Library housed at the Forbes Library in Northampton, then enjoyed some time to tour the town where President Coolidge and his wife lived.


 

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Teachers from western Pennsylvania came to Philadelphia to enjoy a weekend on Alexander Hamilton chaired by Dr. Stephen Knott of the Naval War College. This program was sponsored through the generosity of the Allegheny Foundation of Pennsylvania. Dr. Knott, a Hamilton expert, led the discussion on Hamilton’s View of the Executive, the launching of the new government, the Citizen Genet episode, and the French Revolution. Participants then toured Independence Hall as well as the Liberty Bell.


 

Mt Vernon WEC 2016.04The Diana Davis Spencer Foundation kindly sponsored a weekend colloquium at George Washington’s home, Mount Vernon, with Dr. Bill Allen at the helm. The conversation began Saturday morning on the topic of “Saving the Revolution” followed by “Washington and Union” and ended the day considering, “Why Did Washington Succeed”. Teachers were treated to a private tour of the General’s home and his vast estate.

 

Please visit our events calendar to find upcoming programs near you.

 

Weekend Colloquium: Ronald Reagan Library and Museum

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TAH.org hosted a group of teachers from across the country at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum in Simi Valley, CA, 8-10 April 2016. Reagan’s policies, ideas, and the crises he faced were discussed through a series of primary documents. Teachers were also able to visit the Reagan Library and Museum and take part in a two-hour presidential decision-making simulation, in which each person played the role of someone in Reagan’s leadership team or the media. The simulation challenged teachers to work through multiple policy and media crises, and utilized real-time simulated communications, news stories, and Situation Room information flow.

The discussion leader for the weekend was Dr. Joe Postell of the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs.

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Program Report: Liberty Fund Co-Sponsored Weekend Seminar in Hyde Park, NY

Last weekend 18 teachers from around the country came together in Hyde Park, New York for a Liberty Fund Co-Sponsored Weekend Seminar on Franklin D. Roosevelt.

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Topics of conversation considered whether or not the New Deal programs achieved their intended goal, the constitutionality of the programs and to what extent the New Deal has created today’s “entitled state”. Teachers discussed the need for expanded presidential powers when a crisis is at hand, yet, when the crisis abates, does any President relinquish the control? Roosevelt changed the dynamic of the Presidency and expanded government control over economics and domestic policies. After a long day of thoughtful discussion, teachers toured Franklin Roosevelt’s Hyde Park home and his Presidential Museum.

Abraham Lincoln Program Report

18 teachers from across the country gathered in Springfield, IL, April 1-3, to deepen their knowledge of IMG_0482Abraham Lincoln at our latest Liberty Fund co-sponsored weekend colloquium. Discussion sessions focused on Lincoln’s early public life, his election in 1860, and his handling of the many issues, challenges, and crises associated with sectionalism, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Special emphasis was placed on Lincoln’s keen legal thinking, his deep respect for the traditions of the Founding – especially those embodied in the Declaration of Independence – and the evolution of his ideas and solutions over time.

In addition to the six 90-minute discussion sessions, the group benefitted from visits to the Lincoln Home and his library and museum.

Program Report: 2 Thomas Jefferson Colloquia in Charlottesville, VA

This past weekend TeachingAmericanHistory.org and the Ashbrook Center hosted two weekend colloquia in Charlottesville, VA about Thomas Jefferson. Professor Eric Sands of Berry College, led a colloquium on The Politics of Thomas Jefferson while Professor Robert McDonald of the U.S. Military Academy, led a colloquium on Thomas Jefferson and Education.

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Teachers from across the country at Monticello.

Thomas Jefferson believed that “if a nation expects to be ignorant and free, it expects what never was and never will be.” Dr. McDonald’s group focused on only on Jefferson’s education and his plans for educational reform in Virginia but also his founding of the United States Military Academy in 1802 and the University of Virginia in 1819.

Dr. Sands facilitated conversation that centered on Thomas Jefferson and Politics, which considered topics as the Constitution, Race, Religious Freedom, Education and his lasting legacy. Participants enjoyed an afternoon tour of Monticello which was in full bloom with Spring tulips. After dinner Dr. McDonald delighted everyone with a tour of the University of Virginia to discuss Jefferson’s architectural designs.

Apply Now - Summer Weekend Colloquia at Historic Sites for Teachers

TeachingAmericanHistory.org is proud to offer elite programs to social studies and civic teacher from across the country. TAH.org’s Weekend Colloquia at Historic Sites allows teachers to explore in-depth the people and ideas you are asked to teach, at the historic sites that help illuminate the subject. We want to help you increase your expertise and develop the content knowledge needed to educate your students.

Our programs are designed to reignite your passion for American history and government. Take the content knowledge gained at these programs back to your classroom to inspire your students. Not only will you experience historic sites, like Independence Hall or Monticello, but you will also engage in thoughtful conversation by exploring primary documents with your fellow teachers and a historian/political scientist.

TAH.org Weekend Colloquia at Historic Sites

Teachers from CA to NY in Green Valley, AZ at the Titan Missile Museum

This summer our colloquia topics will include:

  • Henry Clay and the Crises of Antebellum America (Lexington, KY)
  • Security, Self-Determination, and Empire: The Grand Alliance in WWII (New Orleans, LA)
  • Thomas Jefferson, Revered and Reviled (Charlottesville, VA)
  • The Jefferson Enigma: Founder and Statesman (Charlottesville, VA)
  • The Winning of the West and What is Meant: Western Expansion in the 19th Century(Omaha, NE)
  • A Dream Deeply Rooted: Civil Rights in America (Atlanta, GA)
  • John Adams: Founding Vice President and President (Quincy, MA)
  • John F. Kennedy and the New Frontier (Quincy, MA)
  • James Madison: The Father of the Constitution (Montpelier, VA)

For more information regarding these programs, please click here.​

TAH.org also provides program participants with:

  • Reading materials, to be read prior to the program
  • Up to 8 contact hours, with the option to earn 1 graduate credit
  • Hotel accommodations for the weekend (Friday evening through Sunday morning)
  • Complimentary continental breakfast, lunch, dinner, and refreshments during the program
  • A stipend of $225 to help defray the cost of travel to/from the program site

Are you ready to explore history in the places it was made?

Apply Now

The application deadline is Sunday, February 14, 2016.


We look forward to meeting you at one of our programs. Please direct any questions to our Teacher Programs Team at Info@TAH.org or (419) 289-5411 

 

Demon Times: Temperance, Immigration, and Progressivism in an American City

Here’s a new opportunity for teachers from our friends at the Ohio History Connection.

Come learn about America’s Demon Times! This one-week workshop, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, will consider temperance, immigration, and the Progressive movement in American history and culture. Teachers will experience landmarks of the temperance movement and the immigrant experience in late 19th and early 20th century America by exploring Columbus and nearby Westerville, Ohio. Westerville was the home of the Anti-Saloon League, a major temperance organization that explicitly warned against the influence of alcohol, Catholics, and immigrants. Columbus was home to a large German immigrant population, with an attendant brewing industry. This small town and nearby city are emblematic of America in the Progressive Era. Participants will receive a $1,200 stipend to help cover the cost of travel and lodging.

Workshop dates: July 10-15 or July 24-29, 2016. Application deadline: March 1, 2016. Learn more at ohiohistory.org/demontimes.

Program Report: “Civil Disobedience” Seminar in Asheville, NC

Last Saturday teachers from four states gathered in Asheville, North Carolina for one of the final TAH.org seminars of 2015. They discussed “Civil Disobedience” with Dr. David Alvis, an interesting topic that explored America’s founding and it’s roots in civil disobedience. What does civil disobedience mean? How far can a person or group act upon their convictions before it deemed not civil?

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This seminar’s three sessions began with John Locke’s Two Treatises and the Declaration of Independence. Was the American Revolution “revolutionary” or merely a “war for independence” when compared to the French or Russian Revolutions. The second session considered Henry David Thoreau’s idea of conscientious disobedience, that a person is morally obligated to act upon any repugnant injustice or law, regardless of the outcome. However, with that idea come events like John Brown acting on his own moral authority who murders in the name of justice. Juxtapose Thoreau’s writings with Abraham Lincoln’s Lyceum address and he warns of the dangers with “mobocracy” and the need for rule of law at all times. Our third session compared Dr. King’s Letter from a Birmingham Jail writings to Malcolm X “The Ballot of the Bullet”.  All in all, it was a very thought provoking day.

We hope to meet you at one of our programs in 2016.

 

Presidential Academy: MLK’s “I Have a Dream” speech and Modern America

TeachingAmericanHistory.org is proud to offer the third and final part of our Presidential Academy documents-based survey course of American history and American political thought through iTunesU, iTunes, and this blog.

This segment of the course, consisting of 7 sessions, focuses on the Modern America, with the ideas expressed in Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech at the foundation of study. The first session in this part of the course will be posted on Tuesday, 5 January 2016.

Presidential Academy was a grant-funded program that TAH.org presented to groups of teachers who met and studied in three cities over two weeks, with discussions rooted in three separate documents. The first days were in Philadelphia, beginning with the American Founding, through the Declaration of Independence. Additional documents and ideas were addressed and analyzed throughout the several sessions there before the group moved on to Gettysburg and Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. Finally, the group moved to Washington, D.C., and study of modern America, with Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech as the focal point.

Each session is made up of a set of readings, all linked from its blog post, and usually one lecture. Guiding questions and focus issues are at the foundation of each week’s study. A list of the session titles for Part 3 of the course is below, along with the dates on which each will be published on this blog, and the audio made available through iTunes. You can subscribe to our iTunes Podcast feed by clicking here. The entire course, divided into the three major sections – Philadelphia, Gettysburg, and Washington – is already available on iTunesU.

Session 24:  The Modern Era Confronts the American Founding, 5 JAN 16
Session 25: Booker T. Washington; W.E.B. Du Bois, 12 JAN
Session 26: The Progressive Reform and Self-Government, 19 JAN
Session 27: Franklin D. Roosevelt and Democratic Leadership, 26 JAN
Session 28: Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP, 2 FEB
Session 29: Brown v. Board of Education; Martin Luther King, Jr., Non-Violent Resistance, and the American Dream, 9 FEB
Session 30 pt1: Martin Luther King, Jr; Malcolm X, 16 FEB
Session 30 pt2: The Reagan Era and the New Deal Legacy; George W. Bush’s Founding Faith, 23 FEB

We invite you to deepen your knowledge of American history through this series, and use these materials in any way that will benefit you and your students, and we hope that you have enjoyed this course series.

Program Report: “American Founding” Seminar in Charleston, SC

TAH.org was delighted to hold our first South Carolina seminars in the historic town of Charleston at the Charleston History Museum this past weekend. Surrounded by historical artifacts and a replica of the Hunley submarine, Dr. David Alvis and Dr. Eric Sands chaired two separate seminars on the American Founding.

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Participants opened the session entitle “A New World of the Ages” with Lincoln’s “Fragment on the Constitution”, that asks readers to ponder the Declaration of Independence as the Apple of Gold encased by the Frame of Silver, that being the Constitution. Conversation centered on causes for Independence, British Taxation and the second paragraph of the Declaration. Session Two focused on the “Frame of Silver – Republicanism and Separation of Powers”. To what degree did the Articles of Confederation fail and what improvements in the “science of politics” did Publius think necessary to make this new form of republicanism? Readings and consideration focused on Federalist Papers #10 and #51. The final session centered on the Judiciary and Protection of Rights, which we – as a Nation – deem essential. Participants discussed Federalist #78, Brutus – The Anti-Federalist, and Marbury vs. Madison.

We look forward to adding more programs in South Carolina and hope to see many new attendees.

Program Report: Cold War Weekend Colloquium in Green Valley, AZ

 

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Our teachers, from CA to NY and many parts in between

From November 20-22, 17 teachers from across the country gathered in Green Valley, Arizona, to discuss the Cold War with Dr. John Moser of Ashland University. Discussion sessions focused on the origins of the Cold War, Truman and Containment, Eisenhower’s ‘New Look,’ and the Cuban Missile Crisis. The weekend also included a visit to the Titan Missile Museum, the only place in the world where the public can tour a Titan II missile silo. Teachers took part in a special 2-hour tour that included stops in the command center, crew quarters, and silo itself – to include viewing the missile from beneath, at over 120 feet underground – all the while learning about how the complex operated, the crew worked, and the system functioned as part of America’s defense strategy from the 1960s through the 80s. Tour docents included a former Titan II missile complex commander.

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Titan II ICBM, from 120 underground

Program Report: “The Great Depression” Seminar in Knoxville, TN

This past weekend TAH.org hosted a seminar at the Museum of Appalachia on the Great Depression to Knoxville, Tennessee. Teachers from as far away as Asheville, North Carolina sat with Dr. John Moser in front of a blazing fireplace to discuss Presidents Hoover and Roosevelt policies on this economic tragedy.

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Our first session focused on what caused the Great Depression and Hoover’s response. Participants read Hoover’s Statement on the Economic Recovery Program, his message to State Governor’s, and Special Message to the Congress on the Economic Recovery program to name a few. Contrary to common belief, Dr. Moser provided data that President Hoover spent more investment dollars than Roosevelt in the first few years of the crisis. In the second session, the discussion centered on the Election of 1932 and how Hoover’s assessment of the causes and course of the Great Depression differed from Roosevelt’s. Readings included Hoover Analyzes the Development of the Depression and Roosevelt’s Commonwealth Club Address. In the third, and final session, Teachers discussed several of Roosevelt’s Fireside Chats, the Legislation to Create the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the lasting legacy of the New Deal and it’s program.

Program Report: Andrew Jackson Weekend Colloquium in Nashville, TN

The Gaylord Opryland in Nashville, Tennessee hosted teachers for a weekend colloquia on Andrew Jackson chaired by Dr. Dan Monroe from Milliken University. Dr. Monroe led conversations that discussed Jackson’s military career, heroism in the Battle of New Orleans, Presidency, political reform and his lasting legacy. Participants analyzed Jackson’s Inaugural Address to Congress, Bank Veto Message, Force Bill, and Nullification writings. Dr. Monroe also compared several of Lincoln’s writings (and policies) to Jackson’s policies when dealing with South Carolina and secession. Participants also enjoyed a private tour of the Hermitage, grounds, graveyard and museum.

One program participant stated, “I feel very fortunate to have gotten to learn about Jackson in Nashville. The location, information, and resources provided will enhance my lessons on Jackson. Thank you for this opportunity.”

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