We the Teachers

Program Report: Henry Clay Weekend Colloquium

The weekend of June 17th-19th,  teachers from around the country convened in Lexington, Kentucky for a TAH.org Weekend Colloquia on Henry Clay.  This colloquium focused on Henry Clay’s extensive career and statesmanship during America’s antebellum period. As Speaker of the House he assumed a leading role in public affairs only relinquished with his death in 1852. Clay  earned a reputation for fashioning political compromise, soothed sectional tensions and attempted to  preserve the Union. Educators visited The Ashland Estate, Henry Clay’s home and enjoyed an entertaining dinner visit with Henry Clay (re-enactor George McGee) who challenged Professor Dan Monroe to a duel.  

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Program Report: FDR vs. Hoover at the MA Historical Society in Boston

On Saturday, May 21st TAH.org brought Dr. Gordon Lloyd to the Massachusetts Historical Society to present on FDR’s “Forgotten Man” vs. Hoover’s “Rugged Individual”. This seminar discussed the Great Depression, speeches and policies of Presidents Hoover and Roosevelt.

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The conversation considered topics such as Executive Power, the Constitution, The Supreme Court along with the national morale of the people. All of the selected readings can be found in The Two Faces of Liberalism: How the Hoover-Roosevelt Debate Shapes the 21st Century by Dr. Gordon Lloyd.

As Dr. Lloyd says, “May the blessings of Liberty be upon you.”

Program Report: James Madison Colloquium in Montpelier, VA

This past weekend Montpelier, the home of James and Dolley Madison, hosted teachers from the western Pennsylvania region, courtesy the Allegheny Foundation. The topic was James Madison: The Father of the Constitution led by Dr. Chris Burkett. Discussions spanned Madison’s forty year career as a leading proponent for this republic, his contribution to the U.S Constitution and Bill of Rights. This seminar examined the extraordinary statesmanship of Madison and his lifelong defense of liberty and constitutional self government.

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The weekend began Friday evening with Dr. Burkett’s introduction of James Madison. Participants enjoyed a private house tour of Montpelier that concluded with a special session of questions from Mr. Madison, who explained his position on a myriad of topics such as Interposition, Ratification, and answered questions from the teachers.

The final session centered on “Guarding Liberty: The Constitution in the New Republic.” The colloquium concluded with Mr. Madison’s final advice to his country in 1834, “The advice nearest to my heart and deepest in my convictions is that the Union of the States be cherished and perpetuated.”

George Washington’s Mount Vernon Announces New Fall Teacher Institutes

Our friends at George Washington’s Mount Vernon have taken the best elements of their highly popular Summer Residential Program to create their NEW Fall Residential Programs. The two programs being offered are focused on George Washington’s role in the founding of the U.S. Government, as well as his experiences in the military.

They have also extended the deadline for these programs to Friday, May 20, 2016.

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The two programs being offered are:

Each session is designed to support K-12 educators who teach about the life, leadership, and legacy of George Washington and the 18th-century world in which he lived. Join them this fall and return to your classroom with relevant new resources. Learn More

Again, the deadline to apply for these program is now Friday, May 20, 2016. If you are a George Washington Teacher Institute Residential Program Alumni you are eligible to apply as well!

Get more details about the programs and how to apply here.

Program Report: Nuremburg War Trials Seminar in Palm Beach County, FL

IMG_3527On Saturday, May 7, the Palm Beach County School District (FL) hosted a seminar for thirty area teachers about the Nuremburg War Trials led by Dr. David Krugler. Educators discussed the creation of the Tribunal, the charges, the trials, and concluded with the verdict and sentences of convicted. This seminar was the final in a six part series that Palm Beach County Schools held during the 2015-2016 school year.

Please join us for the 2016-2017 TAH.org Series in Palm Beach County School District for the following seminar topics:

  • Origins of the American Idea
  • Civil Rights in America
  • Supreme Court Cases that Changed America
  • Labor History in America
  • Cuban Missile Crisis

Registration will be opening soon.

Program Report: Lincoln Collouquim in Washington D.C.

This past weekend, educators from the western Pennsylvania region attended a weekend colloquium in Washington, D.C. thanks to the generosity of the Allegheny Foundation.

IMG_3504Dr. Lucas Morel of the University of Washington and Lee, chaired the discussion on Abraham Lincoln. Topics and primary documents considered Lincoln’s view on slavery, secession, equality, the  path to emancipation and preservation of the Union. Teachers enjoyed a private tour of Lincoln’s Cottage in D.C. and spent time with the onsite curriculum specialist using many of their online educational resources.

If you are interested in attending one of our programs, please view our calendar to find one near you.

Program Report: LBJ and Vietnam

Seventeen teachers, ranging from California to New York, joined TAH.org andDr. David Krugler of the University of Wisconsin-Platteville in Austin, Texas, for a weekend colloquium about President Lyndon Johnson’s handling of the Vietnam War. The program included a visit to the LBJ Library and Museum, and discussion sessions aimed at gaining a deeper understanding of LBJ’s reasons for war, escalation, strategy for the conflict, and the impact of anti-war protests on him and American policy. In addition to the reading packet, which can be downloaded here, Dr. Krugler recommended both Patriots: The Vietnam War Remembered From All Sides, and for a thoughtful survey of American foreign policy, Promised Land, Crusader State: The American Encounter with the World Since 1776.

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Program Reports: Three East Coast Weekend Colloquia at Historic Sites

Northampton LF 2016.04This past weekend TAH.org conducted three east coast colloquia at historic sites attended by history and government teachers from across the country.

The Liberty Fund co-sponsored program in Northampton, Massachusetts on President Calvin Coolidge was held at the Historic Hotel Northampton Inn. Dr. William Ruger led discussions on Coolidge’s Political Economy, Education, Self-Government and the Constitution. Participants enjoyed a private tour of Calvin Coolidge’s Presidential Library housed at the Forbes Library in Northampton, then enjoyed some time to tour the town where President Coolidge and his wife lived.


 

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Teachers from western Pennsylvania came to Philadelphia to enjoy a weekend on Alexander Hamilton chaired by Dr. Stephen Knott of the Naval War College. This program was sponsored through the generosity of the Allegheny Foundation of Pennsylvania. Dr. Knott, a Hamilton expert, led the discussion on Hamilton’s View of the Executive, the launching of the new government, the Citizen Genet episode, and the French Revolution. Participants then toured Independence Hall as well as the Liberty Bell.


 

Mt Vernon WEC 2016.04The Diana Davis Spencer Foundation kindly sponsored a weekend colloquium at George Washington’s home, Mount Vernon, with Dr. Bill Allen at the helm. The conversation began Saturday morning on the topic of “Saving the Revolution” followed by “Washington and Union” and ended the day considering, “Why Did Washington Succeed”. Teachers were treated to a private tour of the General’s home and his vast estate.

 

Please visit our events calendar to find upcoming programs near you.

 

Weekend Colloquium: Ronald Reagan Library and Museum

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TAH.org hosted a group of teachers from across the country at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum in Simi Valley, CA, 8-10 April 2016. Reagan’s policies, ideas, and the crises he faced were discussed through a series of primary documents. Teachers were also able to visit the Reagan Library and Museum and take part in a two-hour presidential decision-making simulation, in which each person played the role of someone in Reagan’s leadership team or the media. The simulation challenged teachers to work through multiple policy and media crises, and utilized real-time simulated communications, news stories, and Situation Room information flow.

The discussion leader for the weekend was Dr. Joe Postell of the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs.

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Program Report: Liberty Fund Co-Sponsored Weekend Seminar in Hyde Park, NY

Last weekend 18 teachers from around the country came together in Hyde Park, New York for a Liberty Fund Co-Sponsored Weekend Seminar on Franklin D. Roosevelt.

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Topics of conversation considered whether or not the New Deal programs achieved their intended goal, the constitutionality of the programs and to what extent the New Deal has created today’s “entitled state”. Teachers discussed the need for expanded presidential powers when a crisis is at hand, yet, when the crisis abates, does any President relinquish the control? Roosevelt changed the dynamic of the Presidency and expanded government control over economics and domestic policies. After a long day of thoughtful discussion, teachers toured Franklin Roosevelt’s Hyde Park home and his Presidential Museum.

Abraham Lincoln Program Report

18 teachers from across the country gathered in Springfield, IL, April 1-3, to deepen their knowledge of IMG_0482Abraham Lincoln at our latest Liberty Fund co-sponsored weekend colloquium. Discussion sessions focused on Lincoln’s early public life, his election in 1860, and his handling of the many issues, challenges, and crises associated with sectionalism, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Special emphasis was placed on Lincoln’s keen legal thinking, his deep respect for the traditions of the Founding – especially those embodied in the Declaration of Independence – and the evolution of his ideas and solutions over time.

In addition to the six 90-minute discussion sessions, the group benefitted from visits to the Lincoln Home and his library and museum.

Program Report: 2 Thomas Jefferson Colloquia in Charlottesville, VA

This past weekend TeachingAmericanHistory.org and the Ashbrook Center hosted two weekend colloquia in Charlottesville, VA about Thomas Jefferson. Professor Eric Sands of Berry College, led a colloquium on The Politics of Thomas Jefferson while Professor Robert McDonald of the U.S. Military Academy, led a colloquium on Thomas Jefferson and Education.

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Teachers from across the country at Monticello.

Thomas Jefferson believed that “if a nation expects to be ignorant and free, it expects what never was and never will be.” Dr. McDonald’s group focused on only on Jefferson’s education and his plans for educational reform in Virginia but also his founding of the United States Military Academy in 1802 and the University of Virginia in 1819.

Dr. Sands facilitated conversation that centered on Thomas Jefferson and Politics, which considered topics as the Constitution, Race, Religious Freedom, Education and his lasting legacy. Participants enjoyed an afternoon tour of Monticello which was in full bloom with Spring tulips. After dinner Dr. McDonald delighted everyone with a tour of the University of Virginia to discuss Jefferson’s architectural designs.

Apply Now – Summer Weekend Colloquia at Historic Sites for Teachers

TeachingAmericanHistory.org is proud to offer elite programs to social studies and civic teacher from across the country. TAH.org’s Weekend Colloquia at Historic Sites allows teachers to explore in-depth the people and ideas you are asked to teach, at the historic sites that help illuminate the subject. We want to help you increase your expertise and develop the content knowledge needed to educate your students.

Our programs are designed to reignite your passion for American history and government. Take the content knowledge gained at these programs back to your classroom to inspire your students. Not only will you experience historic sites, like Independence Hall or Monticello, but you will also engage in thoughtful conversation by exploring primary documents with your fellow teachers and a historian/political scientist.

TAH.org Weekend Colloquia at Historic Sites

Teachers from CA to NY in Green Valley, AZ at the Titan Missile Museum

This summer our colloquia topics will include:

  • Henry Clay and the Crises of Antebellum America (Lexington, KY)
  • Security, Self-Determination, and Empire: The Grand Alliance in WWII (New Orleans, LA)
  • Thomas Jefferson, Revered and Reviled (Charlottesville, VA)
  • The Jefferson Enigma: Founder and Statesman (Charlottesville, VA)
  • The Winning of the West and What is Meant: Western Expansion in the 19th Century(Omaha, NE)
  • A Dream Deeply Rooted: Civil Rights in America (Atlanta, GA)
  • John Adams: Founding Vice President and President (Quincy, MA)
  • John F. Kennedy and the New Frontier (Quincy, MA)
  • James Madison: The Father of the Constitution (Montpelier, VA)

For more information regarding these programs, please click here.​

TAH.org also provides program participants with:

  • Reading materials, to be read prior to the program
  • Up to 8 contact hours, with the option to earn 1 graduate credit
  • Hotel accommodations for the weekend (Friday evening through Sunday morning)
  • Complimentary continental breakfast, lunch, dinner, and refreshments during the program
  • A stipend of $225 to help defray the cost of travel to/from the program site

Are you ready to explore history in the places it was made?

Apply Now

The application deadline is Sunday, February 14, 2016.


We look forward to meeting you at one of our programs. Please direct any questions to our Teacher Programs Team at Info@TAH.org or (419) 289-5411 

 

Demon Times: Temperance, Immigration, and Progressivism in an American City

Here’s a new opportunity for teachers from our friends at the Ohio History Connection.

Come learn about America’s Demon Times! This one-week workshop, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, will consider temperance, immigration, and the Progressive movement in American history and culture. Teachers will experience landmarks of the temperance movement and the immigrant experience in late 19th and early 20th century America by exploring Columbus and nearby Westerville, Ohio. Westerville was the home of the Anti-Saloon League, a major temperance organization that explicitly warned against the influence of alcohol, Catholics, and immigrants. Columbus was home to a large German immigrant population, with an attendant brewing industry. This small town and nearby city are emblematic of America in the Progressive Era. Participants will receive a $1,200 stipend to help cover the cost of travel and lodging.

Workshop dates: July 10-15 or July 24-29, 2016. Application deadline: March 1, 2016. Learn more at ohiohistory.org/demontimes.

Program Report: “Civil Disobedience” Seminar in Asheville, NC

Last Saturday teachers from four states gathered in Asheville, North Carolina for one of the final TAH.org seminars of 2015. They discussed “Civil Disobedience” with Dr. David Alvis, an interesting topic that explored America’s founding and it’s roots in civil disobedience. What does civil disobedience mean? How far can a person or group act upon their convictions before it deemed not civil?

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This seminar’s three sessions began with John Locke’s Two Treatises and the Declaration of Independence. Was the American Revolution “revolutionary” or merely a “war for independence” when compared to the French or Russian Revolutions. The second session considered Henry David Thoreau’s idea of conscientious disobedience, that a person is morally obligated to act upon any repugnant injustice or law, regardless of the outcome. However, with that idea come events like John Brown acting on his own moral authority who murders in the name of justice. Juxtapose Thoreau’s writings with Abraham Lincoln’s Lyceum address and he warns of the dangers with “mobocracy” and the need for rule of law at all times. Our third session compared Dr. King’s Letter from a Birmingham Jail writings to Malcolm X “The Ballot of the Bullet”.  All in all, it was a very thought provoking day.

We hope to meet you at one of our programs in 2016.

 

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