We the Teachers

Second Roots of Liberty National Essay Contest is Underway!

TAH.org is once again excited to support the Roots of Liberty National Essay Contest. This is an excellent opportunity for a high school teacher to sponsor an outstanding student essay. The contest asks student to build a thoughtful essay about the following:

“In To Make Their Interests Coincide With Their Duty: How the Constitution Leads Public Officials to Make Good Decisions, law professor Robert T. Miller argues that the brilliance of the American Constitution is that it “creates a system of procedures for selecting public officials and ordering how they make decisions that are in the best interests of society.” Analyze one consequential presidential decision to determine to what extent, if any, the Constitution leads presidents to make good decisions.

The winning student essay will received a grand prize of $5,000, plus a trip to D.C. for 2. The teacher who sponsors the winning student will receive a prize of $1,000. Additional cash prizes are available. Find prize and rule details here. The essay contest deadline is Friday, December 15, 2016.

Roots of Liberty National Essay Contest

TAH.org is excited to support the Roots of Liberty National Essay Contest. This is an excellent opportunity for a high school teacher to sponsor an outstanding student essay. The contest question will address, The Powers Delegated to the Federal Government are Few and Defined: The Doctrine of Enumerated Power by Roger Pilon. The best essays will include references to this essay and the Federalist Papers. Find more essay criteria here.

Click here to watch a two minute video about this contest.

The Roots of Liberty National Essay Contest allows teachers to sponsor a student to build a thoughtful essay about the following question, “To what extent, if any, is the federal government restricted by the powers enumerated under Article 1 of the Constitution of the United States in the regulation of ONE of the following: voting rights, marijuana, or the environment?”

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The winning student essay will received a grand prize of $5,000, plus a trip to D.C. for 2. The teacher who sponsors the winning student will receive a prize of $1,000. Additional cash prizes are available. Find prize and rule details here. The essay contest deadline is Friday, April 15, 2016.

The Roots of Liberty: Unlocking the Federalist Papers is a comprehensive curriculum, which addresses the challenges of teaching the Federalist Papers. To see what this curriculum includes click here.

ConstitutingAmerica.org – We The Future Contest

Our friends at Constituting America, A Republic for Which It Stands – Constituting America – “Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people.” John Adams, 1765, have an amazing website filled with resources and materials for students, teachers and citizens. One that has especially caught our eye is their We The Future Contest. This contest is for Patriots of all ages and lets you use your creativity to showcase your love for our great Nation. Check it out!

Also, check them out on Facebook!

 

Essay Contest for High School Students

Attention, High School teachers! The Bill of Rights Institute is holding a scholarship essay contest for current high school students. Winning essays can receive prizes of up to $4,000. The teacher of the winning student also may receive a prize of up to $500.

Student essays will be responses to three questions related to ideas contained in the United States Constitution. Complete details about entry, including the three writing prompts, may be found at the contest website.

The entry deadline is December 6, 2013.

Political Sign Rewind contest

An example of a historic campaign sign created for the Political Sign Rewind contest.

Online sign vendor Signazon.com is sponsoring a “Political Sign Rewind” contest.  Entrants should design and submit a campaign poster in the style of a modern-day candidate yard sign for historical elections.  Imagine what might voters might have seen posted for hotly contested presidential elections like 1800, 1860, or 1912!

As with any online contest, read the terms and conditions carefully before entering.  Still, for social studies teachers interested in exploring with their students the evolving nature of political campaign advertising, having your students plan and create campaign materials for candidates such as Jefferson, Lincoln, or Roosevelt is an excellent way to explore the candidates and issues involved.

50 Documents That Tell America’s Story

Required reading for students, teachers, and citizens.

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