Monthly Archives: February 2018

Revive Your Love of Learning

Remember the excitement you felt the first time you read the Gettysburg Address, watched a presidential debate, or visited a national memorial? You found yourself face to face with the wonder and courage of the Great American Experiment and knew you wanted to give your life to understanding and participating in it yourself.

In the midst of meetings, parent phones, grading, and prep work maybe you’ve lost the passion you first felt for American history.

No matter how long you’ve been working in the education system, you can revive your love of learning. We have some tips to help.

Set a Personal Learning Goal

Setting a personal goal that you can achieve in a reasonable amount of time can do wonders for your intellectual energy. Perhaps it’s reading a certain number of historical biographies in the next year or memorizing the most moving portion of a speech you’ve found inspiring in the past. Set aside a bit of time each day to commit to your goal – even just five or ten minutes. You’ll start feeling empowered and energized even with a small daily habit of learning for your own personal satisfaction.

Mix It Up

We encourage our students toward interdisciplinary learning, providing opportunities for them to combine their knowledge of American history with literature, the arts, science, and their own creative expression. When is the last time you’ve given this gift to yourself?

Visit an art museum to just wander and enjoy American art from your favorite time period. Read Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms next time you teach about The Great War. Or take to your own notebook or canvas to express your feelings about a historical event or famous figure. Exploring a familiar subject from different angles can open your eyes to different ideas and get those synapses popping.

Learn with Others

Getting together to read and discuss ideas with a group of fresh faces and minds can not only revive your love for learning, but bring it to new heights. Each year, Teaching American History offers dozens of seminars and colloquia at various locations across the country at no charge for participants. Whether on-site or online, you and fellow teachers will dive right into original historical documents, from the Constitution to FDR’s Commonwealth Address, under the teaching of university scholars who are experts in their respective fields. Getting to the roots of our country’s exciting and complicated history will not only remind you of why you love this subject, but help you inspire your students as well. We hope you will join us at a program soon!

To learn more about TAH’s free teacher education programs visit http://teachingamericanhistory.org or sign up to receive regular updates about all of our teacher resources!

 

Core American Documents – Sign Up for Early Access to New Volumes!

TeachingAmericanHistory.org is excited to share another resource for American history,  government, civics, and social studies teachers. While you may be familiar with our 50 Core American Documents book, we are launching a new 35-volume document collection.

Each Core American Documents volume will contain the following:

  • Key documents on the period, theme, or institution, selected by an expert and reviewed by an editorial board
  • An introduction highlighting key documents and themes
  • A thematic table of contents, showing the connections between various documents
  • Study questions for each document, as well as questions that refer to other documents in the collection
  • Notes on each document to identify people, events, movements, or ideas to improve understanding of the document’s historical context.

When complete, the series will be comprehensive and authoritative, and will present America’s story in the words of those who wrote it – all united in their commitment to equality and liberty, yet so often divided by their different understandings of these most fundamental American ideas.

The documents are all about this – the still unfinished American experiment with self-government. In sum, our intent is that the documents and their supporting material provide unique access to the richness of the American story. We hope that you will find this resource to be intriguing and helpful for your classroom.

SIGN UP and receive early access to each volume!

Documents in Detail: FDR’s Commonwealth Club Address

 

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TeachingAmericanHistory.org’s Documents in Detail webinar for Wednesday, 21 FEB 2018 focused on FDR’s Commonwealth Club Address, seen as his closing argument to America late in the 1932 election campaign, and as the foundational document for understanding his policies and actions as president.

Access the full archive page here.

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Special Video Presentation: Gordon Lloyd at Pepperdine on the Bill of Rights

 

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Dr. Gordon Lloyd visited Dr. Jeff Sikkenga’s class at Pepperdine University in early February 2018 to talk about the origins of the Bill of Rights, with particular focus on the First Amendment, and the two religion clauses. Dr. Lloyd also used his online exhibit on the Bill of Rights to help students dig deeply into the documentary and historical origins of the rights protected in the Bill of Rights.

Third Volume of Core Documents Collections – The Constitutional Convention OUT NOW!

The third volume of the American History and Government Core Documents Collections – the Constitutional Convention – is now available on iTunes and PDF. Hard copies are also available for $10 each – email dmitchell@tah.org if you would like a copy, or you can purchase it directly from Amazon.

Sign up for early access to each volume!

This collection of documents on the Constitutional Convention is part of our extended series of document collections covering major periods, themes, and institutions in American history and government. This is the second of four volumes that will cover the Founding of the United States. The American Founding, already published, is the capstone of the four. The others – this collection, and volumes on the ratification of the constitution and the Bill of Rights, which will follow it – tell aspects of the founding story in more detail.

The documents in this collection explain why the constitutional convention was held and illustrate the ideas of government and politics that the delegates carried with them to Philadelphia, ideas wrung from their reading and, more important, from the extensive experience of self-government the colonists had enjoyed. Its pages recount the Convention’s critical debates over the purpose and powers of government, the nature of representation, and the relation between the states and the central government. They recount as well the way that slavery and the interests of the various states shaped those debates. Together, the four volumes on the Founding provide the essentials for understanding the Founding as the Founders understood it.

As in the other volumes, each Core Documents volume will contain the following:

  • Key documents on the period, theme, or institution, selected by an expert and reviewed by an editorial board
  • An introduction highlighting key documents and themes
  • A thematic table of contents, showing the connections between various documents
  • Study questions for each document, as well as questions that refer to other documents in the collection
  • Notes on each document to identify people, events, movements, or ideas to improve understanding of the document’s historical context.

When complete, the series will be comprehensive and authoritative, and will present America’s story in the words of those who wrote it – all united in their commitment to equality and liberty, yet so often divided by their different understandings of these most fundamental American ideas.

In sum, our intent is that the documents and their supporting material provide unique access to the richness of the American story. We hope that you will find this resource to be intriguing and helpful for your classroom.

Please contact Daniel Mitchell if you have any questions or would like more information about using the Core Documents Curriculum in your classroom.

Thank you for all that you do!

Saturday Webinar: The Cuban Missile Crisis

 

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TAH.org’s 3 FEB 18 Saturday Webinar looked deeply into the Cuban Missile Crisis, the ’13 days’ during which the world seemed to teeter on the bring of nuclear war.

How did this crisis come into being? How was evidence of the missiles discovered, and verified? What was the nature of the crisis – that is, were there people within JFK’s inner circle who saw it differently than it is typically portrayed? How did the upcoming midterm elections factor into decision-making and internal analysis by Kennedy and his people? How did JFK’s experience from the Bay of Pigs impact his view on Cuba? And what impact did the crisis have on Castro’s control over Cuba?

Our panelists dug into these questions and others, working with a live audience of over 100 teachers from across the country.

The following books were recommended for additional reading:

One Hell of a Gamble,” Aleksandr Fursenko and Timothy Naftali

We Now Know, John Lewis Gaddis

Access the full archive page here

Register for future episodes

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