Monthly Archives: November 2017

Saturday Webinar: Lincoln’s Assassination

 

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TAH.org continued its Saturday Webinar series on November 18th, 2017, looking deeply at the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. A far larger, more complex, and more ambitious plot than many people understand it to be, John Wilkes Booth’s attempt to ‘decapitate’ the leadership of the United States government shook both North and South, creating immediate and lasting political, legal, and cultural waves, shaping what became post-war Reconstruction and the years beyond.

In addition to a lively discussion of the plot itself and its immediate and longer-term impacts, the panelists suggested James Swanson’s Manhunt: The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln’s Killer for those interested in further reading about the assassination itself.

Access the program archive page here

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Documents in Detail: What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?

 

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15 November’s Documents in Detail webinar was about Frederick Douglass’s What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?, his oration delivered on 5 July 1862. There were some technical difficulties in the first minutes of the program, which resulted in one of the panelists being a few minutes late. Otherwise, it was an interesting discussion of the occasion on which Douglass spoke, his place as one of the leaders of the abolition movement in the 19th Century, and the importance of the ideas he expressed in the speech.

Access the program archive page here

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Weekend Colloquium: Andrew Jackson

From 3-5 November, TAH.org hosted 18 teachers from across the country in Nashville, TN, for a Liberty Fund co-sponsored colloquium on Andrew Jackson. Meeting for six 90-minute discussion sessions throughout the weekend, the teachers studied Jackson’s public life, with an eye toward seeking to describe and make sense of his political philosophy and how and why he sought to change American politics of his day.

Of special consideration was his role as something of an avatar for his age – the only era of American history named after a single person – and how his views shaped his politics, and how his politics changed America, giving the country its oldest political party – the Democrats – and elevating the cause of the ‘common man’ to being on par with what had up to that point been a rule of mostly Virginia planter elites. This American populism has continued to shape our politics, policies and institutions to this day.

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