Monthly Archives: October 2017

Weekend Colloquium: Abraham Lincoln

TAH.org and Liberty Fund co-sponsored a weekend colloquium in Springfield, Illinois, October 13-15. 17 teachers from across the country gathered to study the public life of Abraham Lincoln, working through a collection of documents that spanned from his first run for state office, to Frederick Douglass’ memorialization of him in 1876. In addition to the six discussion sessions, teachers visited both the Lincoln home and presidential museum.

Third Annual Roots of Liberty Essay Contest!

TAH.org is once again pleased to support the third annual Roots of Liberty National Essay Contest. This is an excellent opportunity for a high school teacher to sponsor an outstanding student essay. The contest asks student to build a thoughtful essay about the following:

In If Men Were Angels, No Government Would Be Necessary, law professor Stephen B. Presser argues that, “[f]or the Framers of the Constitution the practice of politics was all about how to distribute power within the government in order to preserve private property, individual rights, and the rule of law which secured both.”

Has the Constitution succeeded in preserving the interests of those outside the majority?  If so how and why?  If not, how and why?  A thoughtful response will include at least one historical example (18th, 19th, 20th centuries) and one contemporary example (21st century.)

The winning student essay will received a grand prize of $5,000, plus a trip to D.C. for 2. The teacher who sponsors the winning student will receive a prize of $1,000. Additional cash prizes are available. Find prize and rule details here. The essay contest deadline is Friday, December 15, 2017.

*Essay responses are limited to 3,250 characters (approximately 500 words).

World War I and the Founding of the Disabled American Veterans

2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the entry of the United States into World War I. We’re pleased to share with you a new lesson developed for the Ohio History Connection by 2010 Ohio History Teacher of the Year Paul LaRue.

Entitled Captain Robert S. Marx: Decorated World War I Soldier and Founder of the Disabled American Veterans, this lesson plan will introduce your students to veterans’ organizations, the circumstances of their founding, and their role in US historically and in the present.  While focused on the role of Ohioans in the founding of the DAV, the materials are easily adaptable for use elsewhere in the US.

 

Lesson Plan: Captain Robert S. Marx: Decorated World War I Soldier and Founder of the Disabled American Veterans

Documents in Detail: Monroe Doctrine

 

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18 October’s Documents in Detail program focused on the Monroe Doctrine – that which gave rise to the politics that led to it, what it said and meant, and how it represented a growing sense of American identity in the world and a guide for relations with other countries at the time, throughout the rest of the 19th Century, and even to today.

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Moments of Crisis Webinar: Nullification Crisis

 

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This month’s Saturday Webinar was about the Nullification Crisis of 1832. Our program began with the question, which comes up so often in early American History on the topic of slavery and sectionalism, which is “why South Carolina?” What made that state – since the Constitutional Convention and even before, so seemingly intransigent about issues important to them? What about other states, especially in the South – were they as unyielding in their views on local issues, as well?

Discussed at length were the historical and immediate economic and political roots of the Nullification Crisis, how the Crisis itself developed and unfolded, and how it was resolved, and in terms that were surprisingly familiar to modern listeners: bank foreclosures, lost homes, and a federal government at odds with local priorities.

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