Monthly Archives: August 2017

Documents in Detail: Declaration of Independence

 

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The first Documents in Detail session for the 17-18 school year took place on 30 August 2017, with a discussion of the Declaration of Independence. Among the many topics and questions discussed were Jefferson’s idea of an “American Mind,” the issue of Jefferson’s authorship – which was no widely known for years after the document was written – and the many local declarations of independence, hundreds of which were written by towns, churches, and civic groups during the first half of 1776.

The panelists fielded questions about the choice of Jefferson as the primary author and the input and impact of other delegates to the Second Continental Congress, and pointed out that Jefferson’s use of Locke’s ideas and language acted as “18th Century hyperlinks,” which virtually any reader would recognize as important ideas, if not also as the works of John Locke. Also of interest was the discussion of the parts that were left out of the final, accepted draft and the first draft.

This program could work well with students as well as teachers and anyone interested in learning more about why the document was written, what it meant, and what it still means.

Books mentioned include Edmund Morgan’s American Freedom, American Slavery, Jay Fliegelman’s Declaring Independence: Jefferson, Natural Language, and the Culture of Performance, and Annette Gordon-Reed and Peter Onuf’s “Most Blessed of the Patriarchs”: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of Imagination.

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Philadelphia Travel Resource

Are you planning on visiting historic Philadelphia, either yourself or with students? Our Constitutional Convention exhibit has resources about the Convention itself, and also an interactive map of 1787 Philadelphia, with information about sites related to the Convention and those who attended it. You can also download a PDF copy of the map and the entries on it and carry it on a tablet or some other device while walking around the city.

Another great resource to consider as you put together lessons about the Founding is our American History Toolkits, specifically the section about the American Founding. Our Toolkits will help you transition from relying on textbooks to using original documents and documents-based resources only.

Saturday Webinar: The Intolerable Acts

 

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TAH.org’s first Saturday Webinar of the 2017-18 school year took place on 26 August, focusing on the Intolerable Acts. Over 120 teachers joined our panel of scholars for a live discussion of the directives from Parliament that made up the Acts, looking at what they said, how they were received, and how they shaped the colonial response to British rule. Dr. Todd Estes, one of the panelists, recommended Unbecoming British as a good book for additional background on how the American colonists transformed from a colonial to a post-colonial people.

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LBJ’s Birthday: 27 August

27 August of 2017 marks the 109th birthday of Lyndon Baynes Johnson, our 34th president. Below are some resources worth using to learn more about the president behind the Great Society, and saddled with much of the legacy of the Vietnam War.

Summer Podcast: Re-examining Hoover and FDR

 

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Hoover and FDR, presidents during the Great Depression, are often fit neatly into nearly-stereotypical categories: the do-nothing and the man of action; the old, ineffective approach and new, successful perspectives. Dr. John Moser of Ashland University discusses where and how these images of the two presidents are accurate, misleading, and in some places incorrect.

TAH.org’s new seasons of live Webinars will begin on 26 August, with the first Saturday Webinar, focused on the Intolerable Acts.

Summer Podcast: Religion and Science – The Case of Eugenics

 

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This podcast discusses the eugenics movement in the United States in the first decades of the 20th century. Eugenics gained authority from science, earned the support of prominent Americans, and led to the passage of sterilization laws designed supposedly to enhance the human gene pool. The podcast explains why religious leaders joined the eugenics movement and why others opposed it. Understanding the eugenics movement helps us understand the complex relationship between science, religion and politics in American history.

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