Monthly Archives: January 2016

Demon Times: Temperance, Immigration, and Progressivism in an American City

Here’s a new opportunity for teachers from our friends at the Ohio History Connection.

Come learn about America’s Demon Times! This one-week workshop, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, will consider temperance, immigration, and the Progressive movement in American history and culture. Teachers will experience landmarks of the temperance movement and the immigrant experience in late 19th and early 20th century America by exploring Columbus and nearby Westerville, Ohio. Westerville was the home of the Anti-Saloon League, a major temperance organization that explicitly warned against the influence of alcohol, Catholics, and immigrants. Columbus was home to a large German immigrant population, with an attendant brewing industry. This small town and nearby city are emblematic of America in the Progressive Era. Participants will receive a $1,200 stipend to help cover the cost of travel and lodging.

Workshop dates: July 10-15 or July 24-29, 2016. Application deadline: March 1, 2016. Learn more at ohiohistory.org/demontimes.

Session 27: Franklin D. Roosevelt and Democratic Leadership

Prof. Kesler:  

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Focus

The political and constitutional legacy of Franklin D. Roosevelt is impressive. What was his extraordinary achievement? In what ways did he improve upon Jefferson’s, Lincoln’s, and the Progressives’ understanding of democratic life and political structures? How did his New Deal envision a powerful, active, and programmatically ambitious national government? How was this related to the possibility of self-government? What is his legacy?

Session 26: The Progressive Reform and Self-Government

Prof. Kesler:  

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Focus

The Progressives fought for reform at the turn of the century. What principled form did their criticism take of the Declaration, the Constitution, and political decentralization take? They revered Lincoln, yet did not emulate his devotion to the Declaration of Independence, but invoked the preamble to the Constitution to make democracy more active. Jefferson’s and Hamilton’s views became living arguments again, but with interesting shifts. Self-government was in need of some assistance. What effect did their reforms—for example, direct primaries, initiative, referendum—have on federalism, separation of powers, and political parties? What legacy did the Progressives, Woodrow Wilson in particular, leave the nation?

Session 25: Booker T. Washington; W.E.B. Du Bois

Dr. Lucas Morel:  

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Focus

What did Washington believe were the most urgent priorities for blacks at the close of the 19th century? On what issues was Washington prepared to compromise and why? What were the goals of Washington’s program and how did these differ from the recommendations of W.E.B. Du Bois? Why does Du Bois seek to “conserve” the races? How would “the conservation of the races” help the future of the Negro race as well as the future of world civilization? What principles of the American regime appear to run counter to Du Bois’s emphasis on “race organizations” and “race solidarity”? What does Du Bois mean by the “talented tenth”? Compare Washington and Du Bois on the purpose of education.
Readings:
Du Bois:
Supplemental/Optional Readings:
    Booker T. Washington:

  • Washington, Up From Slavery (1901), chap. 3, “The Struggle for an Education”
  • Washington, “Address on Abraham Lincoln,” (February 12, 1909)
  • Louis Harlan, “Booker T. Washington in Biographical Perspective” (October 1970), 1581-1599
  • Fairclough, Better Day Coming, chap. 3
W.E.B. Du Bois:

American Presidents: Theodore Roosevelt

 

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TAH.org kicked off 2016 with the sixth episode in this year’s American Presidents webinar series. Today’s 75-minute program, moderated as always by the Dr. Chris Burkett of Ashland University, included discussion of TR’s economic, domestic, and foreign policy moves and ideas, his place in American presidential politics, and his impact on electoral politics even today.

In addition to answering the many excellent questions posed by teachers, the scholars recommended the History of American Political Thought as a good resource for learning more about TR’s ideas and ideology.

You can also access the documents and a YouTube archive of the program here, on TAH.org.

Session 24: The Modern Era Confronts the American Founding

Profs. Morel and Kesler:  

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Focus

What did the American founding and Civil War look like to politicians and public intellectuals at the start of the 20th century?
Readings:

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