Monthly Archives: August 2015

Saturday Webinar: George Washington

 

| Open Player in New Window

We kicked off the 2015-16 season of TAH.org’s Saturday Webinars with George Washington, father of our country, and a discussion of his person, times, and the challenges America faced in its first years as a republic. Read the documents and view a YouTube archive of the discussion – attended by over 100 teachers right here.

Session 7: The Constitutional Convention pt3 – The Committee of Detail Report and the Close of the Convention

Prof. Gordon Lloyd:  

| Open Player in New Window

Focus

Who was elected to the Committee of Detail and what has been their position so far with respect to the republican and federal issues? How does the Committee on Detail Report differ from the original and amended Virginia Plans and what significant recommendations did it make? Who was elected to the Slave Trade Committee and what had they said about slavery up to that point? How did the slavery provisions undergo changes during the deliberations?

The Bill of Rights: A Comprehensive Course

TeachingAmericanHistory.org’s Dr. Gordon Lloyd, author of the Online Exhibits on the American Founding, is the presenter of six one-hour lectures on the Bill of Rights, from its historical roots to ratification. TAH.org now offers these lectures, and associated primary documents, as an iTunes U course, which you can access here. You’ll need an iOS device to experience the interface as it’s been designed; however, you can access the videos and all of Dr. Lloyd’s online content at the Bill of Rights exhibit on TAH.org.

Religious Liberty and the American Founding

 

| Open Player in New Window

George Washington’s Letter to the Hebrew Congregation in Newport, RI is perhaps the best expression of the spirit of religious liberty that shaped the new American republic.  August of 2015 is the 225th anniversary of its composition, and our webinar on 22 AUG was in celebration of this important moment in American history.

In addition to Washington’s letter, scholars and teachers discussed Madison’s “Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments” and the Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom.  All three documents may be found in 50 Core American Documents: Required Reading for Students, Teachers and Citizens.

For the story behind the letter and additional information about it, please visit the web site of the George Washington Institute for Religious Freedom.

Session 6: The Constitutional Convention pt2 – The Connecticut Compromise

Prof. Gordon Lloyd:  

| Open Player in New Window

Focus

What accounts for the persistence of the New Jersey Plan supporters despite their defeat earlier? What are the arguments against the “legality” and “practicality” of the Amended Virginia Plan? When and how did the Connecticut Compromise emerge as a viable alternative? How did the “partly national, partly federal” concept enter the discussion? Why did Madison argue that the issue facing the delegates was not small states vs. large states but the slavery question? What is the significance of who was elected to the Gerry Committee? Who changed their minds and why during this month long discussion over representation? Who favored and who opposed the Connecticut Compromise? What else, besides the representation issue, was discussed during this part of the Convention?

Session 5: The Constitutional Convention, pt1 – The Alternative Plans

Lecture, Prof. Gordon Lloyd:  

| Open Player in New Window

Focus

Of what significance were the rules adopted by the Convention? In what respects did the Virginia Plan represent a new constitution rather than a mere revision of the Articles? What were delegates’ initial reactions and questions concerning the Virginia Plan? What parts of the Plan were rejected or amended? What did the delegates mean when they spoke of a national government as opposed to a federal government? What different principles animate the New Jersey and Virginia Plans and the Hamilton Proposal? Why were they even introduced? What are the arguments for representation of the states, as opposed to the people, in the federal government? Consider the discussions of the executive power, bicameralism, and the role of the judiciary in the context of “republican principles.” What do “republican principles” say about the sources of power, the powers, and the structure of the federal government? Is Madison’s extended republic argument a departure from republican principles?

Session 4: The Revolutionary Era

Lecture, Dr. David Hackett Fischer:  

| Open Player in New Window

Focus

How did the American colonists define liberty and freedom as they sought to secure their independence from mother England? During the Revolutionary War, what difficulties did the Americans face in fighting for liberty while maintaining the supremacy of civilian over military authority?
Readings
  • Fischer, Washington’s Crossing

TAH.org Weekend Colloquium: New Orleans

TAH.org hosted a diverse group of teachers in New Orleans over the weekend of 31 July to 2 August. The topic, Security, Self-Determination, and Empire: The Grand Alliance, 1941-1945, focused on the interactions between the United States, Great Britain, and Soviet Union during World War 2, with a special emphasis on the Yalta Conference of 1945, during which many of the agreements for the post-war world and divisions of land, people, and power were made. Teachers visited the National World War 2 Museum and along with seeing the new European Theater Galleries, saw the outstanding Tom Hanks-narrated Beyond All Boundaries documentary. In keeping with the special format of the program – a documents-based simulation of the Yalta Conference, with teachers playing the roles of specific national leaders and their assistants, with competing agendas and priorities – it was decided that an attempt at a recreation of the famous photo of the ‘Big 3’ at Yalta would be appropriate.

Keep your eyes on our Weekend Colloquia page for dates and locations for Fall 2015 programs. You can also register to receive email updates through the interest form at the bottom of our homepage.

IMG_0075

TeachingAmericanHistory.org is a project of the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University

401 College Avenue | Ashland, Ohio 44805 (419) 289-5411 | (877) 289-5411 (Toll Free)

info@TeachingAmericanHistory.org