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Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points

Woodrow WillsonPresident Woodrow Wilson had asked Congress to declare war against imperial Germany in April of 1917,¬† after German submarines began attacking merchant ships supplying the Allies. Congress complied, and by January of 1918 the defeat of Germany appeared imminent. On January 8 he spoke to Congress again about the War, outlining peace terms that, he argued, would prevent future wars of aggression. Articulating¬† “fourteen points” necessary to secure a just and lasting peace, Wilson claimed a role for enlightened American leadership of world affairs. In Wilson’s idealistic vision, “the day of conquest and aggrandizement is gone by; so is also the day of secret covenants entered into in the interest of particular governments and likely at some unlooked-for moment to upset the peace of the world.” Hence he confidently proposed as his last point “A general association of nations . . . formed under specific covenants for the purpose of affording mutual guarantees of political independence and territorial integrity to great and small states alike”–his idea of a League of Nations.

Wilson’s “Fourteen Points Message” is included in the new Ashbrook publication, 50 Core American Documents: Required Reading for Students, Teachers, and Citizens. You may read the document with Professor Christopher Burkett’s introduction and questions for consideration and discussion here.

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