Monthly Archives: July 2012

The Valley of the Shadow Project

The “Valley of the Shadow” Project created by the Virginia Center for Digital History (University of Virginia) details life in two American communities from the time of John Brown’s raid through Reconstruction. The Northern community in Franklin County, Pennsylvania and its Southern cousin in Augusta County, Virginia provide unique perspectives from hundreds of people of Civil War era events. Students, Teachers, and fans of this time period can explore thousands of original letters, diaries, newspapers and speeches, and more from this unique archive.

Lesson Plan of the Week: Abraham Lincoln on the American Union: “A Word Fitly Spoken”

This lesson that was created by Professor Lucas Morel and Teacher Constance Murray, explores the political thought of Abraham Lincoln on the subject of American union. Students will examine Lincoln’s three most famous speeches—the Gettysburg Address and the First and Second Inaugural Addresses—in addition to a little known fragment on the Constitution, union, and liberty to see what they say regarding the significance of union to the prospects for American self-government. These speeches and other lesson resources can be accessed through this interactive. Upon completion, students should have a better understanding of why Lincoln revered the union of the American states as “the last best, hope of earth.”

The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln

In 1953, the Abraham Lincoln Association published The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, a multi-volume set of Lincoln’s correspondence, speeches, and other writings.  Roy P. Basler and his editorial staff, with the continued support of the association, spent five years transcribing and annotating Lincoln’s papers.  The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln represented the first major scholarly effort to collect and publish the complete writings of Abraham Lincoln, and the edition has remained an invaluable resource to Lincoln scholars. Through the efforts of the Abraham Lincoln Association, the edition is now available in electronic form at the linked above site. These works can be searched using a variety of methods which will help teacher and student alike save time to more fully grasp Lincoln’s ideas.

Learn Liberty

Learn Liberty is website run by the Institute for Humane Studies and designed to assist educators in addressing key issues in economics, philosophy, and other disciplines. In the Classroom Resources section of the Learn Liberty website, teachers can find curriculum guides, and videos. Learn Liberty is great for supplemental material, to start a discussion and to structure outside-of class assignments.

Bill of Rights Institute: Constitutional Workshops for Teachers

The Bill of Rights Institute offers Constitutional Workshops for teachers. These workshops take place all across the United States and include a copy of their teacher-written curriculum, a certificate for 6 hours of professional development and bi-monthly emailed lesson plans. There are dates available this fall.   Register today for a location close to you.

“Apple of Gold:” The Centrality of the Declaration of Independence in American Political Life

Why is it important to understand the Declaration of Independence? What does the Declaration say, and why and how does it say it? What does the Declaration not say, and why and how does it not say it? Explore the answer to these and other questions asked and  answered in this lecture delivered by Professor Christopher Flannery from June of 2002. Happy 4th!

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