We the Teachers

From the Archives: Re-Thinking Uncle Tom: The Political Philosophy of H.B. Stowe

 

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The first of two sessions from Professor Bill Allen, about the political philosophy of Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. This was recorded at the Ashbrook Center with a live audience of teachers on 24 January, 2009. This 74-minute program consisted of remarks by Dr. Allen and a question and answer session with teachers.

Generally critics and interpreters of Uncle Tom have constructed a one-way view of Uncle Tom, albeit offering a few kind words for Uncle Tom along the way. Recovering Uncle Tom requires re-telling his story. Harriet Beecher Stowe’s oeuvre, in partnership with that of her husband Calvin, constitutes a demonstration of the permanent necessity of moral and prudential judgment in human affairs. Moreover, it identifies the political conditions that can best guarantee conditions of decency. Her two disciplines—philosophy and poetry—illuminate the founding principles of the American republic and remedy defects in their realization that were evident in mid-nineteenth century. While slavery is not the only defect, its persistence and expansion indicate the overall shortcomings. In four of her chief works (Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Sunny Memories of Foreign Lands, Dred, and Oldtown Folks), Stowe teaches not only how to eliminate the defect of slavery, but also how to realize and maintain a regime founded on the basis of natural rights and Christianity. Further, she identifies the proper vehicle for educating citizens so they might reliably be ruled by decent public opinion.

Saturday Webinar: McCulloch v. Maryland

 

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Drs. Chris Burkett, Jeremy Bailey, and Dan Monroe discussed the historical context, constitutional connections and reasoning, and legal and political legacy of the second in our Landmark Supreme Court Cases webinars, McCulloch v Maryland (1819). Access the archives of the program here and subscribe to our iTunes podcast.

Liberty Fund Weekend Colloquium: Abraham Lincoln

Eighteen teachers from across the United States gathered in Springfield, IL, from 9-11 September to study Abraham Lincoln’s public life, through a broad selection of readings representing his early political career, the Lincoln-Douglas Debates, and the phases of his presidency. Led by Dr. Joe Fornieri, teachers took part in six 90-minute discussion sessions throughout the weekend, and also visited the historic Lincoln Home and Lincoln Museum, both in Springfield.

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Five Teachers Compare Student Attitudes Toward Civil War

In this post, we report on five teachers’ project to assign a common book probing American understanding of the Civil War. Five Madison Fellows from five states, four of them in the MAHG program, required all their American history students to read the same historical text, Apostles of Disunion, which makes a compelling argument against a long-standing theme of historiography on the American Civil War. 

Five Teachers Compare Student Attitudes in North and South Toward the Civil War

A Conversation with Historian Charles Dew

Charles Dew, author of Apostles of Disunion, published this month The Making of Racist: A Southerner Reflects on Family, History, and the Slave Trade. Part memoir, part history, this thoughtful book argues we need public dialogue on slavery and its legacy. We discussed this and the MAHG teachers’ collaborative project in our interview with him.

A Conversation with Historian Charles Dew

Creative Collaborations Among Teachers

The friendships that begin in the Master of Arts program in History and Government lead to a fertile exchange of teaching ideas. Recently they’ve led to teaching collaborations across time zones.

In this post, we share the story of two teachers who collaborated in assigning a local history project. Through it, students in California and Ohio learned that trends in national history have shaped their hometowns in parallel ways.

California and Ohio Teachers Collaborate on Local History Project

 

 

MAHG by the Numbers

On Saturday, August 13th, Ashland University awarded the degree of Master of Arts to 24 MAHG/MASTAHG students.  Since 2005, 174 students have earned the degree.

Twenty-two of these new graduates were in the MAHG program; two were in MASTAHG program.  They came from 15 states and include 14 James Madison Fellows.  Two students wrote a thesis, four created a capstone project, and 18 completed their studies via the qualifying examination.

There are now 244 students in the MAHG program; 75 in MASTAHG.  These students come from 48 states, the District of Columbia, and one US territory, the Virgin Islands (yeah, Norda!).

A free coffee mug to anyone who guesses which two states don’t have representatives in MAHG.  Two free coffee mugs if you enroll in the program from one of those states!

Students on campus this summer came from 36 states. For the Fall schedule of classes, go to https://www.ashland.edu/mahg/student-informationschedule-courses/fall-2016.  For more information, please contact Chris Pascarella at cpascarella@tah.org.

Saturday Webinar: Marbury v. Madison

 

 

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On Saturday 27 August 2016, TAH.org hosted its first Saturday Webinar of the 2016-17 school year, on Marbury v. Madison. This year’s theme of Landmark Supreme Court cases got off to a great start with a thoughtful discussion of the politics and constitutional aspects of the at the time it was decided, and the legal and constitutional legacy in the years since. Scholars also discussed the case as related to the concepts of both judicial review and judicial supremacy, and the extent to which the Constitution was seen as a legal, rather than political document.

You can visit the archive page of this program here.

Program Reports: The Father of the Constitution and The New Frontier

TAH.org hosted two Colloquia the weekend of August 12-14: James Madison: The Father of the Consitution at Montpelier and John F Kennedy: The New Frontier in Quincy, Massachusetts.  

No single person contributed more to the constitutional mind of America than James Madison.  Through his contributions to the U.S. Constitution, Madison shaped this republican form of government.  Professor Chris Burkett, of Ashland University, led the conversation as teachers explored readings on religious liberty, the Federalist Papers, Bill of Rights and Madison’s final advice to his country.  Participants enjoyed a three hour tour of Montpelier and its beautiful grounds.  

Professor Stephen Knott, of the Naval War College, chaired the Weekend Colloquium on President John F. Kennedy, the nation’s youngest elected President.  This colloquium examined Kennedy’s brief presidency, including his Cold War policies toward the Soviet Union, Cuba, Berlin and Vietnam, his domestic initiatives on civil rights; as well as his lasting impact on the office of the presidency.  Teacher visited the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum as well.  

For more information and teacher resources, please visit our website www.teachingamericanhistory.org

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Ashbrook Teachers outside Montpelier

Ashbrook Teachers engaging in discussion during the Father of the Constitution colloquia.

Ashbrook Teachers engaging in discussion during the Father of the Constitution colloquia.

New TAH.org Site Feature: Enhanced Sitewide Search

TeachingAmericanHistory.org has a new feature: a simple, enhanced search tool embedded on every page of the site. If you look in the upper-right corner of any page you’ll see the Search box that’s always been there – but now you have the ability to select whether you want the search term to be applied to whole site, or just our Documents Library. If you select Documents, you’ll be able to search the titles and contents of our 2300+ primary documents, providing easier, faster access to the information you want.

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Program Report: August 5-7 Weekend Colloquia

This last weekend, Aug 5th-7th, TeachingAmericanHistory.org conducted two Weekend Colloquia at Historic Sites for forty-five teachers from across America.  

Professor Steve Knott, with the Naval War College, chaired the colloquia on “John Adams:  Founding Vice President and President” in Quincy, Massachusetts. John Adams had a lengthy and illustrious career, spanning over 40 years in public service. This weekend’s conversation focused on “The First Vice President” “Adams, Washington, Jefferson and Hamilton”,  “President John Adams” and the last session discussed “The Election of 1800 and It’s Aftermath.” Teachers also enjoyed a private tour of United First Parish Church, where John Adams and John Quincy Adams are buried, as well as tours of the Adams Homestead.  

Ashbrook Teachers tour the United First Parish Church in Quincy, MA, where John Adams and John Quincy Adams are buried

Ashbrook Teachers tour the United First Parish Church in Quincy, MA, where John Adams and John Quincy Adams are buried.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professor Peter Myers, with the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, led the colloquia on “Civil Rights in America” in Atlanta, Georgia. Teachers delved into primary documents that covered topics such as “Civil Rights: the Prologue” “The Turning Point: Brown v Board of Education” “The Civil Rights Movement: Victory and Division” and the “Post Civil Rights Era.”  Participants toured the Center for Civil and Human Rights for several hours.

Ashbrook Teachers outside the Center for Civil and Human Rights

Ashbrook Teachers outside the Center for Civil and Human Rights in Atlanta, GA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To learn more about this program and other available teaching resources, please visit www.TeachingAmericanHistory.org.

Program Report: The Civil War at the Massachusetts Historical Society

Saturday, July 30th, TeachingAmericanHistory.org partnered once again with the Massachusetts Historical Society for a Forum on the Civil War, generously sponsored by the Filene Foundation in Massachusetts.  Dr. Joseph Fornieri, Political Scientist with the Rochester Technical Institute chaired the conversation with three sessions: “A House Divided” Causes of the Conflict; “The Apple of Gold and Picture of Silver”: Secession and The Union; and finally “A New Birth of Freedom.” We enjoyed lively discussion under the watchful gaze of John and Abigail Adams, Daniel Webster and  General Washington (some of the  portraits in the meeting room).  When the program concluded, participants enjoyed several new exhibits at the Massachusetts Historical Society, such as the pen that President Lincoln used to sign the Emancipation Proclamation. General Washington’s epaulet’s are on display as are several letters of John Winthrop,  along with artifacts of King Phillip’s War. If you are in the Boston area, please stop in and visit!

The pen Abraham Lincoln used to sign the Emancipation Proclamation

The pen Abraham Lincoln used to sign the Emancipation Proclamation.

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Dr. Joseph Fornieri leading discussion at the Forum on the Civil War at the Massachusetts Historical Society.

Program Report: The Grand Alliance at New Orleans

Teachers from California to Massachusetts gathered in New Orleans, Louisiana, from 22-24 July to learn about the historic Yalta Conference of February 1945, in which the stage was set for much of the geopolitical boundaries and balance for the latter half of the 20th Century. Teachers participated in a weekend-long documents-based  simulation in which each person played the role of a participant in the conference, using primary documents to promote the causes of their delegation and seek to achieve individual goals, as well. The program also included a visit to the National World War 2 Museum, and a viewing of the outstanding Beyond All Boundaries film.

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Dr. John Moser, of Ashland University and the co-chair of the Master of Arts in American History and Government degree program, served as discussion leader.

Program Reports: “The American Founding” and “The Origins of the Cold War”

The Manatee Technical College hosted a two day TAH.org seminar on the topics of The American Founding and The Origins of the Cold War that drew teachers from southern and central Florida.  Dr. David Alvis, from Wofford College, led the discussion on The American Fouding, with three sessions that considered documents such as Abraham Lincoln’s “Fragment on th the Constitution”; Tocqueville’s Democracy in America; James Madison’s “Vices of the political System of the United States” Federalist Papers #47, #10 and #51.  

Dr. David Krugler, Professor at the University of Wisconsin – Platteville, chaired conversation in the Origins of the Cold War Seminar.  Thirty educators came together to discuss documents of Wartime Alliance 1939-1941, followed with readings on the Origins of Containment 1945-1947 and we concluded with primary sources on the Practice of Containment 1947-1950.  

For more information on upcoming seminars and programs, please visit www.teachingamericanhistory.org.  

Teachers with Professor David Krugler at Manatee Technical College

Program Report: Charlottesville Weekend Colloquia

This past weekend, July 22-24, TeachingAmericanHistory.org and the Ashbrook Center hosted two Weekend Colloquia in Charlottesville, VA on Thomas Jefferson.  Professor Eric Sands of Berry College, chaired a Colloquia on The Politics of Thomas Jefferson while Professor Robert McDonald of the U.S. Military Academy, led a Colloquia on Thomas Jefferson and Education.  

Thomas Jefferson believed that “if a nation expects to be ignorant and free, it expects what never was and never will be.”  One group focused on only on Jefferson’s education and his plans for educational reform in Virginia but also his founding of the United States Military Academy in 1802 and the University of Virginia in 1819.  

Dr. Sands facilitated conversation that centered on Thomas Jefferson and Politics, which considered topics as the Constitution, Race, Religious Freedom, Education and his lasting legacy.  Participants enjoyed an afternoon tour of Monticello which was in full bloom with spring tulips.  After dinner Dr. McDonald delighted everyone with a tour of the University of Virginia to discuss Jefferson’s architectural designs.  

A group of Ashbrook Teachers taking in the sights at Monticello.

A group of Ashbrook Teachers taking in the sights at Monticello.

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